break with sb/sth phrasal

break with sb/sth phrasal
verb (T)
1 to leave a group of people or an organization, especially because you have had a disagreement with them: break with sb/sth over sth: Powell broke with the Conservative Party over Europe.
2 break with tradition/the past to stop following old customs and do something in a completely different way
2 noun
1 A REST
a) (C) a period of time when you stop what you are doing in order to rest, eat etc: without a break: Larry had worked all day without a break. | tea/coffee/lunch break: It's time for a coffee break. | have/take a break: Let's take a ten minute break.
b) (C) a short holiday: weekend break: a travel agent specializing in weekend breaks | the Easter/Christmas etc break (=the public or school holiday at Easter etc)
c) (U) also break time BrE the time during the school day when classes stop and teachers and students can rest, eat, play etc; recess 1 (2) AmE: I'll speak to you at break.
2 A PAUSE IN STH
a) (C) a period of several weeks or years during which something stops, before continuing again
(+ in): a welcome break in my normal routine | career break: Demi Moore planned to take a career break to have children.
b) (C) a pause in a conversation or in what someone is saying
(+ in): She waited for a break in the conversation.
c) also commercial break a pause for advertisements during a television or radio programme: Join us again after the break.
3 END/CHANGE (singular) an occasion when you end a relationship with a person, organization etc, or change the way that things have always been done in the past
(+ from): Medieval thought represents a sharp break from that of the Greeks. (+ with): In a break with tradition, they held their wedding at home. | a clean break (=a very clear and definite end to a relationship): I don't want a messy divorce, just a quick, clean break. | make the break: She's wanted to leave Dave for years, and last week she finally made the break.
4 A SPACE (C) a space between two things or between two parts of something: The sun shone through a break in the clouds. | a break in the weather (=a short period of good weather)
5 A CHANCE (C) informal a sudden or unexpected chance to do something, especially be successful in your job: big/lucky break: My big break came when I was spotted singing in a club by a talent scout.
6 make a break for sth to suddenly start running towards something in order to escape from a place: As soon as the guard's back was turned they made a break for the door. | make a break for it (=try to escape)
7 BROKEN PLACE (C) the place where a bone in your body has broken: It's a nasty break, the bone has splintered.
8 give sb/sth a break! spoken used when you want someone to stop talking about something or doing something because it is annoying you: I'm sick of hearing about your problems. Just give it a break.
9 give me a break! AmE spoken used when you do not believe something someone has said
10 TENNIS also break of serve (C) a situation in a game of tennis in which you win a game when your opponent is serving (serve1 (10)): break point (=the moment when if you win the point, you win a game)
11 POINTS (C) the number of points won by a player when it is their turn to hit the ball in a game such as billiards or snooker 1
12 the break of day literary the time early in the morning when it starts getting light

Longman dictionary of contemporary English. 2004.

Игры ⚽ Нужен реферат?

Look at other dictionaries:

  • break above/below sth — UK US break above/below sth Phrasal Verb with break({{}}/breɪk/ verb [T] (broke, broken) ► to produce levels or figures that are slightly higher or lower than something: »The soybean market failed to break above its seasonal high of $6.61 …   Financial and business terms

  • ˈbreak with sth — phrasal verb 1) to leave a group that you have worked with, because of a disagreement 2) if someone breaks with the past or with tradition, they start doing things in a new way …   Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • break — break1 W1S1 [breık] v past tense broke [brəuk US brouk] past participle broken [ˈbrəukən US ˈbrou ] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(separate into pieces)¦ 2¦(bones)¦ 3¦(machines)¦ 4¦(rules/laws)¦ 5¦(promise/agreement)¦ 6¦(stop/rest)¦ 7¦(end something)¦ …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • break above sth — UK US break above/below sth Phrasal Verb with break({{}}/breɪk/ verb [T] (broke, broken) ► to produce levels or figures that are slightly higher or lower than something: »The soybean market failed to break above its seasonal high of $6.61 …   Financial and business terms

  • break below sth — UK US break above/below sth Phrasal Verb with break({{}}/breɪk/ verb [T] (broke, broken) ► to produce levels or figures that are slightly higher or lower than something: »The soybean market failed to break above its seasonal high of $6.61 …   Financial and business terms

  • Break — A rapid and sharp price decline. The New York Times Financial Glossary * * * ▪ I. break break 1 [breɪk] verb broke PASTTENSE [brəʊk ǁ broʊk] broken PASTPART [ˈbrəʊkən ǁ …   Financial and business terms

  • break — A sudden price move; prices may break up or down. The CENTER ONLINE Futures Glossary A rapid and sharp price decline. Related: crash. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary * * * ▪ I. break break 1 [breɪk] verb broke PASTTENSE [brəʊk ǁ broʊk] …   Financial and business terms

  • break — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 short rest; short holiday/vacation ADJECTIVE ▪ little, quick, short ▪ coffee, dinner (esp. BrE), lunch, tea (BrE) ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • break into sth — UK US break into sth Phrasal Verb with break({{}}/breɪk/ verb [T] (broke, broken) ► to begin working in a new business or a new area: »He wanted to break into the advertising business. »Are there new markets you d like to break into? …   Financial and business terms

  • break through sth — UK US break through sth Phrasal Verb with break({{}}/breɪk/ verb [T] (broke, broken) ► to go higher than a particular level: »Sales have finally broken through the $1 million barrier …   Financial and business terms

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”